1

The Era of Your Ways

As you know, the mutant race known as Millennials bears no resemblance to the previous species that roamed the Earth, and unlike their forebearers, they don't drive cars, don't get married, don't work hard, and they're entitled, narcissistic, selfie-taking, social media addicts who refuse to clean up their childhood rooms (well into their thirties). So what I am about to suggest will sound blasphemous to those of us who built the social foundation that this freakish tribe is so determined to crumble. Millennials might be just like the rest of us, and their behaviors and defining trends -- like the ones adopted by those before them -- are driven by market and cultural forces beyond their control. For example, what if Millennials want to buy homes, but they can't because they are saddled with too much student debt driven by massive college tuition hikes?

+ It turns out the the olds have been blaming the youngs for ruining the world for a long time. For example, "Geoffrey Chaucer had fretted over the younger generation's perceived negative influence on both communication and language." (And as we know, language wasn't actually ruined until the 2016 election). From the Boston Globe: An age-old accusation.

2

Clinically Inane?

"It's the paradox at the heart of the Cleveland Clinic, as it lures wealthy patients and expands into cities like London and Abu Dhabi. Its stated mission is to save lives. But it can't save the neighborhood that continues to crumble around it." Politico Magazine with an interesting look at how a health system can help heal the world, but totally miss the people living right next door.

3

Maryland Mansion

"We consider it absolutely unacceptable to place conditions on the return of diplomatic property, we consider that it must be returned without any conditions and talking." The Obama administration seized two Russian diplomatic compounds in part to retaliate for Russia's hacking of the election. Now, Russia wants the mansions back. The matter is complicated by the fact that the leader of the current administration has repeatedly called the election hacking a hoax.

4

A Lawyer and a Doctor Walk Into Reality

"Of all the heartbreaking details of his story, the one that continues to haunt me is this: The history on his cellphone shows the last call he ever made was for work. Peter, vomiting, unable to sit up, slipping in and out of consciousness, had managed, somehow, to dial into a conference call." From the NYT, The Lawyer, the Addict: A high-powered Silicon Valley attorney dies. His ex-wife investigates, and finds a web of drug abuse in his profession.

+ LA Times: An overdose, a young companion, drug-fueled parties: The secret life of USC med school dean.

5

Valley Swirl

"Pagkalinawan said she can't recall how many times her glass was refilled. She does, however, remember the VC touching her leg, leaning over to kiss her, and telling her that he wanted to take care of her." Following a series of stories about sexual harassement in Silicon Valley, more women are coming forward to tell their stories. From CNN: Sexual Harassment in Tech.

+ Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is leading a new charge to address sexual assault on college campuses. The guest list at her initial listening sessions have some folks concerned. From The New Yorker: The Trump Administration's Fraught Attempt to Address Campus Sexual Assault.

+ "They said six women live in properties rented by Kelly in Chicago and the Atlanta suburbs, and he controls every aspect of their lives: dictating what they eat, how they dress, when they bathe, when they sleep, and how they engage in sexual encounters that he records." Buzzfeed shares some weird (but consistent) claims about R. Kelly: Inside the Pied Piper of R&B's Cult.

6

Hoop Dreams

"He needs to be a kid. He needs to just be Neiko. Who knows if he's going to be good when he's older? No one. But I do know he only has one chance to grow up. Youth basketball is crazy and puts so much pressure on these kids at such a young age. I am doing my best to protect him from all that." WaPo on the life and times of the number one ranked basketball phenom in America. He's nine.

7

Swamp Things

"It's hard for the United States to pursue international anticorruption and ethics initiatives when we're not even keeping our own side of the street clean. It affects our credibility. I think we are pretty close to a laughingstock at this point." The outgoing head of the Office of Government Ethics is worried.

+ Meanwhile, President Trump continues to argue that most politicians would have taken the meeting with the Russians, and tweeted that "Hillary Clinton can illegally get the questions to the Debate & delete 33,000 emails but my son Don is being scorned by the Fake News Media?" (You know, he has a point. Why didn't the media cover the Hillary email story? If they had, she might have lost the election.)

+ "I've never been this emotionally invested in a political leader in my life," he said. "The more they hate him, the more I want him to succeed. Because what they hate about him is what they hate about me." The New Yorker's Peter Hessler on how Trump is transforming rural America.

8

The Forever War

"The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan claimed 17,000 and 16,000 lives respectively in 2016, although in lethality they were surpassed by conflicts in Mexico and Central America, which have received much less attention from the media and the international community." According to a new report, Mexico was the second deadliest country in 2016.

9

Heard Mentality

"When I got home, the first thing I did was get behind my computer. I quickly noticed: Hey, this doesn't work anymore. It took a while for me to realize I could still play fighter games. At first, I played a few hours a day. Then, for months, I would just sleep, eat, play, sleep, eat, play. I didn't go to school at the time because I was still recovering. So, yeah. Gaming played a huge role in my childhood, and it still does to this day." Motherboard on a blind guy who plays videogames a lot better than you do.

10

Bottom of the News

"Every organization needs some way to govern itself -- to designate who has authority to make decisions concerning its affairs, what their powers are, and what consequences they may mete out to those beneath them in the organizational chart who fail to do their part in carrying out the organization's decisions." Since it's Monday, let's look at how bosses are (literally) like dictators.

+ A cool look at the 100 greatest props in movie history, and the stories behind them.

+ Caitlyn Jenner is considering a bid for U.S. Senate in California. (It's refreshing to see a celebrity who is willing try out politics with an entry level role...)